Does CBD Lotion Show Up On A Drug Test?

There are many questions that people have about CBD, but most of them center around whether the cannabinoid will show up on a drug test. With CBD lotion, in particular, people often wonder whether it’s a drug-test-safe remedy. And to reduce confusion, this article will explain how CBD lotion works and why it doesn’t show up on a drug test.

  1. What is CBD and is CBD legal? 

CBD, short for cannabidiol, is a chemical compound from the Cannabis sativa plant, whish is also known as marijuana or help, according to the US National Library of Medicine. It’s a naturally occurring substance that’s used in products like oils and edibles to impart a feeling of relaxation and calm. Unlike its cousin, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the major active ingredient in marijuana, CBD is not psychoactive. – Source

Thanks to the 2018 Farm Bill, the production, possession and sale of CBD products is legal in the United States. The Farm Bill distinguished hemp from cannabis, meaning CBD products are not considered drugs unless they contain over 0.03% THC, and can therefore be used and distributed legally. – Source

  1. What are the different types of CBD?

CBD extracts are typically labeled as one of the following types.

Full-spectrum CBD

Full-spectrum CBD extracts contain all of the compounds that occur naturally in the plant they were extracted from.

In other words, full-spectrum products include CBD alongside terpenes, flavonoids, and other cannabinoids such as THC.

Full-spectrum CBD products are typically extracted from the marijuana subspecies.

Full-spectrum marijuana-derived CBD oil may contain varying amounts of THC.

Full-spectrum hemp-derived CBD oil, on the other hand, is legally required to contain less than 0.3 percent THC.

Not all manufacturers disclose where their full-spectrum extracts come from, so it can be difficult to assess just how much THC may be present in a given product.

Full-spectrum CBD is widely available. Products range from oils, tinctures, and edibles, to topical creams and serums.

Broad-spectrum CBD

Like full-spectrum CBD products, broad-spectrum CBD products contain additional compounds found in the plant, including terpenes and other cannabinoids.

However, in the case of broad-spectrum CBD, all of the THC is removed.

Because of this, broad-spectrum CBD products are less likely to contain THC than full-spectrum CBD products.

This type of CBD is less widely available. It’s most often sold as an oil.

CBD isolate

CBD isolate is pure CBD. It doesn’t contain additional compounds from the plant it was extracted from.

CBD isolate typically comes from hemp plants. Hemp-based CBD isolates shouldn’t contain THC.

This type of CBD is sometimes sold as a crystalline powder or a small, solid “slab” that can be broken apart and eaten. It’s also available as an oil or tincture.

  1. What is CBD lotion? 

There are lots of ways to use cannabidiol (CBD), but if you’re looking for relief from aches and pains or help with skin conditions, a lotion might be your best bet. A CBD lotion is any lotion that’s infused with CBD and can be applied directly to the skin. While research on CBD is still in its early stages, the little we do know about CBD topicals is promising. A 2016 study done on rats discovered that topical applications of CBD could help manage pain and inflammation associated with arthritis. American Academy of Dermatology even suggested using topical CBD products as an adjunct measure for acne, eczema, and psoriasis at their annual meeting in 2018.

  1. Does CBD lotion get you high?

Lotions are infused with a variety of cannabinoids. The most common is CBD, which does not contain any of the psychoactive properties that cannabis is renowned for. Instead, it is utilised for its medicinal benefits. However, some lotions do contain other cannabinoids like THC and CBN. Given that THC is the key psychoactive component in cannabis that enables users to get high, it is understandable that some remain sceptical about the use of lotion. The thing is, our skin acts as a protective barrier, which it does an excellent job at. To give you an example of how lotions cannot get you high, consider rubbing alcohol. Those who apply alcohol to a cut are still able to drive afterwards without fear of being over the legal limit. This is because it cannot be absorbed into the bloodstream through their skin. CBD lotions work on the same principle. The cannabinoids bind to receptors in our skin, muscle tissue, and nerves, but get absorbed before they could permeate through our skin into the bloodstream. THC only gets users high when it reaches our brains, something it cannot do through the surface of the skin.

  1. What are the benefits of CBD lotion? 

Research suggests that CBD may be beneficial for a number of different skin conditions. These may include:

  • Acne: Acne is the most common skin condition in humans. CBD contains many compounds with oil-reducing, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties that may help improve acne. A 2014 study explored the effects of CBD on human sebocytes. These are the cells that create sebum, which is a waxy, oily substance the skin produces. While sebum helps protect our skin, excessive sebum can also result in acne. The study indicates that CBD can prevent sebocytes from creating too much sebum. A 2016 review notes the potential antibacterial and antifungal properties of the cannabis plant. This could help prevent acne due to infections on the skin. A 2019 study suggests that CBD may also be beneficial for treating the appearance of acne scars.

  • Dryness and itching: A 2019 study notes that CBD may be useful for treating some common symptoms of skin conditions, such as dryness and itching. The anti-inflammatory properties of CBD may be particularly useful for reducing potential triggers of eczema, dermatitis, and psoriasis.

  • As CBD oil can help soothe skin and reduce the appearance of irritation, it may be useful for people with sensitive skin.
  • Aging and wrinkles: A 2017 study highlights the antioxidant properties of CBD. Oxidative stress can contribute toward the aging process. Therefore, the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of CBD may help prevent the appearance of aging in the skin.

  • Infection: As the cannabis plant may contain antibacterial and antifungal properties, it may be useful for treating infections on the skin.

  • Affect skin cell growth. A 2007 study suggested that cannabinoids could treat psoriasis by stopping the buildup of skin cells. A 2017 study found that a synthetic cannabinoid, JWH-133, might be effective at treating psoriasis, although animal and human trials are still needed. More recently, a review published in 2019 concluded that cannabinoids could be able to treat psoriasis, but that more research is needed before we know for sure.
  • Act as an anti-inflammatory. Cannabinoids like CBD are also anti-inflammatories, and as recent research points out, cannabinoids are connected to inflammatory skin conditions and might be able to treat them.
  • Manage pain. Plenty of research suggests that CBD can effectively manage pain. Given that psoriatic arthritis is a painful condition, many people with psoriasis use CBD. Other cannabinoids, such as THC, have also been linked to soothing pain. Pain management is a common reason why people seek medical cannabis.
  1. Does CBD lotion show up on a drug test? 

Lotion products that claim to contain CBD—like shampoos, cosmetics or creams—should not cause any reaction during a drug test because they do not enter the bloodstream. With lotions unable to get users high, it also would stand to reason that it’s not possible to fail a drug screening as a result of their use. Additionally, this study from 2017 [1] confirmed that topicals containing the psychoactive cannabinoid, THC, did not cause a positive test in both blood and urine.

  1. Can other CBD products show up on a drug test? 

Theoretically, people can fail a drug test if they consume a CBD product that also contains THC. CBD-rich products derive from cannabis or hemp, both of which contain the full spectrum of cannabinoids, including THC. In a 2019 analysis of 67 CBD-containing food products in Germany, researchers found that 25% of the samples contained THC above the 2.5 milligrams-per-day dose associated with intoxicating side effects. Although manufacturers may state that they eliminate the THC from their products, this may not be the case. Sometimes, the product has not been third-party tested or is inappropriately labeled, misrepresenting the actual THC dose. People can also receive a false-positive result for cannabis or THC on a urine drug screen if they use other drugs, including:

  • dronabinol
  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, naproxen, and sulindac
  • pantoprazole

One study in the Journal of Analytical Toxicology demonstrated that people exposed to passive, or second-hand cannabis smoke, can test positive on a saliva drug test. Cannabis-free volunteers sat in an unventilated room for several hours with five people who each smoked one cannabis cigarette. The researchers detected THC in the saliva of each of the cannabis-free volunteers, but these amounts declined over the time spent in the room. Researchers do not know whether exposure to second-hand cannabis smoke will produce a positive saliva test outside of the study environment. An older study tested whether second-hand cannabis smoke can result in a positive urine drug screen. The researchers collected 80 urine samples 24 hours after they exposed cannabis-free participants to second-hand cannabis smoke. Only two samples tested positive, but none tested at or above federal thresholds.

8. What other factors may contribute to CBD use showing up on a drug test? 

There are several potential reasons why CBD use might lead to a positive drug test result.

Cross-contamination

There is potential for cross-contamination during the CBD manufacturing process, even when THC is present only in trace amounts.

Cross-contamination may be more likely for manufacturers preparing products that contain CBD only, THC only, or a combination of the two.

The same is true in stores and at home. If CBD oil is around other substances that contain THC, cross-contamination is always a possibility.

Secondhand exposure to THC

Although it’s unlikely that you’ll receive a positive drug test result after exposure to secondhand marijuana smoke, it’s possible.

Some research suggests that how much THC you absorb through secondhand smoke depends on the potency of the marijuana, as well as the size and ventilation of the area.

Product mislabeling

CBD products aren’t consistently regulated, which means that there typically isn’t a third party testing their actual composition.

A 2017 study from the Netherlands evaluated the accuracy of the labels provided on 84 CBD-only products purchased online. The researchers detected THC in 18 of the products tested.

This suggests that product mislabeling is fairly common in the industry, although more research needs to be done to confirm if this is also true for American CBD products.

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